A Slideshow of the City of Boulder in the Wake of Historic Flooding

During flooding on September 12, 2013, Boulder Creek ran at 16 times its normal rate for this time of year.

During flooding on September 12, 2013, Boulder Creek ran at 16 times its normal rate for this time of year. (Photo/Caitlin Rockett)

Boulder County officials and emergency responders are still working to bring order to the chaos created by this week’s historic flooding. Though the waters have receded in some areas, the National Weather Service forecasts more rain over the weekend. Here are pictures from around the city of Boulder from September 12 and 13.

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To BPA or Not to BPA

By Caitlin Rockett

The Boulder Stand recently received an email from a company that claims to make “the cleanest water bottle on the planet.” The email requested that we embed the following infographic on our website:

“The Plastic Water Bottle Effect”

While we aren’t interested in hawking their product (we’re pretty sure you can figure it out on your own), we do think there’s a lot to be said about plastics.

According to the EPA, the U.S. generated 31 million tons of plastic waste in 2010. (Photo/Klearchos Kapoutsis via flickr)

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Sustainable Colorado: How green is our Colorado Craft Beer Week?

(Photo/April Nowicki)

(Photo/April Nowicki)

By April Nowicki

The Colorado Craft Beer Week is happening now, probably not more than a couple minutes’ drive from where you are.

Blind keg tapping, snow gear giveaways, a rail jam in Longmont — it sounds like a lot of Coloradans love beer festivals. But wait! This is Colorado — it’s not very green to drive. Take a bike or the bus instead, or at least make sure to carpool in a Subaru. Here’s a look at how sustainable and low-impact some of the contenders from our state’s craft beer week are.

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Science and Environment News Round-Up: Week of March 15

(Photo/Alex DeWind)

(Photo/Alex DeWind)

Why you should definitely always drink more alcohol, bat-killing spiders, fracking around the world, and things living under the Earth’s crust — all these things and more in this week’s news round-up.

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It’s Not Easy Being Green: Environmental Journalists Weigh In on the End of The New York Times’ Green Blog

(Photo/Joe Shlabotnik via Flickr)

(Photo/Joe Shlabotnik via Flickr)

By Caitlin E. Rockett

On March 1, The New York Times’ Green blog made an unexpected announcement – the “Grey Lady” was discontinuing their only blog solely dedicated to energy and environmental news.

The outpouring of frustration and anger was immediate and seemingly universal. Comments on the blog spanned the usual gamut, from snarky climate change deniers to somber environmentalists, but the overarching sentiment was undeniable: The decision reflects poor judgment and The Times should be ashamed.

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Science and Environment News Round-Up: Week of Feb. 22

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(Photo/Alex DeWind)

Pheromones, cockroaches, awesome space photos and why roundworms could unlock the mysteries of mating — check out this week’s news round-up for all the interesting stories you may have missed.

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Eternally Green: Taking Your Eco-Friendly Habits into the After Life

(Photo/Workshop by Donna Belk and Sandy Booth via flickr)

(Photo/Workshop by Donna Belk and Sandy Booth via flickr)

By Caitlin Rockett

These days it’s not enough to live a sustainable life – you’ve got to take your eco-friendly habits into the after life.

In what is sometimes called “green,” “natural” or “conservation” burial, the goal is to reduce the resources used in end-of-life rites, and gently return the body to the Earth.

Burials and cremation are the most common ways to handle bodies after death, but these traditional methods are fraught with ecological problems.

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Science and Enviroment News Round-Up: Week of Feb. 15

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(Photo/Alex DeWind)

Detachable penises, dating websites for scientists, and a terrible Nic Cage flick: this week’s round-up has a little bit of something for everyone.

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Seven Ways to Keep Your Heart Happy (hint: Have More Sex)

Heart

(Photo/Garrett Ammon via Flickr)

By Brittany McNamara

The heart is what keeps the human body running, and as the center of all bodily functions, it’s important to keep it healthy.

According to the Center for Disease Control, over 700,000 Americans experience a heart attack and approximately 600,000 people die from heart disease every year in the United States. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women and men. February is America Hearth Month, and in honor of it, we’ve got some tips on how to keep your heart in tip-top shape.

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McDonald’s Takes Steps Toward Nutrition and Sustainability

(Photo/bandarji via Flickr)

(Photo/bandarji via Flickr)

By Brittany McNamara

McDonald’s is no longer just cheap burgers. Within the last year or so McDonald’s has been making nutritious and sustainable changes to their company between providing QR codes on their packaging that provides nutrition information and making all of their fish Marine Stewardship Council-certified. McDonald’s made these changes because it’s what the people want, and while these changes might not be much in the eyes of a small town organic farmer or environmental activist, it’s better than nothing.

For more information, check out this story from the Nutrition Business Journal.